Daffodil Project brings awareness of Holocaust to FCS students

  • Posted 3/15/2024

     

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    Flower beds full of daffodils greeted visitors with beaming yellow warmth on a cold, rainy day as they walked into New Prospect Elementary School (NPE) for their early March Daffodil Project blooming ceremony.

    Aimed at creating a living memorial for the 1.5 million children who perished during the Holocaust, the Daffodil Project helps make an historic issue relatable to current school-aged children.

    Bulbs are planted in the fall, hold steady through the gloom of winter, and later burst in springtime with brilliant color and new growth – a physical sign of hope. The shape of a daffodil also serves as a reminder of the yellow stars Jewish children in Germany, Czechoslovakia, Poland and across Europe were forced to wear during World War II.

    The flowers at New Prospect are sponsored by the school’s Parent Teacher Association (PTA) to remember the horrors those children faced while honoring the resilience of those who survived.

    Ceremony speakers including staff, parents, students and NPE alumni, including middle and high school representatives, spoke about how the Butterfly Project and the Daffodil Project help build awareness around the Holocaust and promotes empathy for victims of persecution. During the week, students spent time creating their own butterflies, which then adorned the hallways and cafeteria walls.

    School leaders across the district have embraced this teaching opportunity. Similar efforts have been initiated with spring blooms also adorning the flowerbeds at Centennial, Johns Creek, North Springs, and Northview High Schools and Autry Mill, Haynes Bridge, Medlock Bridge and Taylor Road middle schools. Haynes Bridge, as well as others, has even integrated the Daffodil Project into their social studies curriculum while teaching about the Holocaust.

    Each generation has the responsibility to teach the next about our history.  Sadly, we must include the tragic along with the heroic. The Daffodil and Butterfly projects are an important way for the community to recognize the significance of the Holocaust.  With the simple act of planting a bulb or drawing a picture, students build upon the promise that humankind shall never forget these events.

     

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